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PREPARE/ENRICH – Core and Going Deeper Training Hornsby Nov/Dec

The Core Training Day includes all aspects of the Customised Version necessary to enable and accredit the Facilitator to use the material immediately.

The fee covers the programmed two day arrangement. It is preferable when the Core and Going Deeper Training days are run consecutively, that participants attend both days. If that is not feasible or is not available, you can attend the Going Deeper Training day within 12 months from the Core Training workshop, as advertised on this website.

The Going Deeper Day is a follow-up and consolidation day. It includes skills training and practice opportunities for working with feedback techniques and workbook exercises. The day covers selected content and processes relevant to working with step-families, mature age couples and conflicted couples.

It may be taken when registering as part of a programmed two day arrangement, or if that is not feasible or is not available, on a day to be selected (within 12 months) from the Core Training workshop, as advertised on this website.

The Core Training Day is a prerequisite to the Going Deeper Day.

Who may train to administer the inventories?

Persons working with couples (eg. marriage celebrants, educators, counsellors) who already have formal training as a –

  • Pastor/priest/minister/rabbi.
  • Counsellor/Psychologist
  • Educator
  • Social Worker
  • Worker trained in another relevant human resource discipline

and –

  • Lay people, who also have training in the above areas, nominated by, approved by, and supervised by and accountable to leaders of the institution (eg. clergy, pastors, priests) within which they will work. We are prepared to train such individuals and couples but they need to be selected and nominated with care.  Just because they are church members and have participated in a PREPARE/ENRICH program as part of their own preparation for marriage is not a sufficient qualification. It is important to consider their knowledge and skills.
An Early Bird Discount of 10% is available if you register and pay up to 30-days prior to Facilitator Training.
 

Please refer to full the terms and conditions including the cancellation policy here: www.prepare-enrich.com.au/terms-conditions

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When Flipping your Lid is a Dangerous option! The Importance of Self Soothing

This evening offers FOCCUS and Prepare facilitators the opportunity to learn new skills and explore creative approaches to working with couples as they prepare for marriage.

When Flipping your Lid is a Dangerous option! The Importance of Self Soothing

Stress is a normal part of life. Relationships can provide the safe haven from day to day stress. But what happens when interactions within the relationship feel stressful? How can we learn (and help our couples to learn) to turn off the alarm bell going off inside our head, give ourselves support in our mind, body and spirit? What methods of self-soothing can we develop to let ourselves know that we do have the resources to deal with whatever is troubling us in this moment? Are some methods of self-soothing healthier than others? What role can the partner play in this endeavour?

This session will explore these questions by direct experience, experimentation and curious discussion.

Presenter: Cathy Dixon is a psychologist and FOCCUS facilitator. She currently works as a couple counsellor at Relationships Australia Victoria in Kew. She previously was involved in marriage and relationship education with CatholicCare Melbourne for 17 years. She has undertaken teacher training in mindfulness at the Centre for Mindfulness Research and Practice, Bangor University, Wales. She is nurtured and informed by her mindfulness practice and enjoys leading Mindfulness training groups.

Presenter:    Cathy Dixon

When:          Thursday, 8 November, 2017      

Time:           7.15pm – 9.30pm

Where:         Knox Centre

383 Albert Street

East Melbourne

Please enter building from car park entrance off Lansdowne Street

(Car parking available behind Knox Centre, enter off Lansdowne St)

Cost:            $15 per person MAREAA member OR $20.00 per person non MAREAA member

Bookings and enquiries:

Email: relationships@ccam.org.au or info@mareaa.asn.au

Note  1   Payment to be made in cash at the door.

Certificate of attendance for PD purposes will be available from MAREAA.

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PREPARE/ENRICH – Core and Going Deeper Training Parramatta October

The Core Training Day includes all aspects of the Customised Version necessary to enable and accredit the Facilitator to use the material immediately.

The fee covers the programmed two day arrangement. It is preferable when the Core and Going Deeper Training days are run consecutively, that participants attend both days. If that is not feasible or is not available, you can attend the Going Deeper Training day within 12 months from the Core Training workshop, as advertised on this website.

The Going Deeper Day is a follow-up and consolidation day. It includes skills training and practice opportunities for working with feedback techniques and workbook exercises. The day covers selected content and processes relevant to working with step-families, mature age couples and conflicted couples.

It may be taken when registering as part of a programmed two day arrangement, or if that is not feasible or is not available, on a day to be selected (within 12 months) from the Core Training workshop, as advertised on this website.

The Core Training Day is a prerequisite to the Going Deeper Day.

Who may train to administer the inventories?

Persons working with couples (eg. marriage celebrants, educators, counsellors) who already have formal training as a –

  • Pastor/priest/minister/rabbi.
  • Counsellor/Psychologist
  • Educator
  • Social Worker
  • Worker trained in another relevant human resource discipline

and –

  • Lay people, who also have training in the above areas, nominated by, approved by, and supervised by and accountable to leaders of the institution (eg. clergy, pastors, priests) within which they will work. We are prepared to train such individuals and couples but they need to be selected and nominated with care.  Just because they are church members and have participated in a PREPARE/ENRICH program as part of their own preparation for marriage is not a sufficient qualification. It is important to consider their knowledge and skills.
An Early Bird Discount of 10% is available if you register and pay up to 30-days prior to Facilitator Training.
 

Please refer to full the terms and conditions including the cancellation policy here: www.prepare-enrich.com.au/terms-conditions

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Text, Twitter, Tweet… Men tend to use texting when avoiding confrontation

Text as a casual method of staying in touch seems to be a good thing. Many people text to maintain the relationship however studies show that men and women generally text at differing levels of intimacy. Women do not generally text about severe subjects and men even less so.

Men also tend to use texting when they are avoiding confrontation, while female texting frequency was positively associated with their own relationship stability.

Lori Schade and Jonathan Sandberg, studied 276 young adults in the US to see what communicating through texts did to their relationship. 38 percent described their relationship as serious, 46 percent were engaged, and 16 percent were married. Each of them completed a detailed relationship assessment that covered, among other things, their use of technology.

Here are a few highlights from the report they publish in the Journal of Couple and Relationship Therapy:

  • For women: Using text messages to apologise, work out differences or make decisions is associated with lower relationship quality
  • For men: Too frequent texting is associated with lower relationship quality
  • For all: Expressing affection via text enhances the relationship

Male texting frequency was negatively associated with relationship satisfaction and stability scores for both partners while female texting frequency was positively associated with their own relationship stability scores. Texting to express affection was associated with higher reported partner attachment for both men and women.

References:

  • Louis D. Lo Praeste, death and texting, 25 October 2017,
  • Lori Cluff Schade, Jonathan Sandberg, Roy Bean, Dean Busby, Sarah Coyne 2013: Using Technology to Connect in Romantic Relationships: Effects on Attachment, Relationship Satisfaction, and Stability in Emerging Adults, P 314-338 Published online: 28 Oct 2013
  • BYU professors Roy Bean, Dean Busby and Sarah Coyne co-authored the study with Schade and Sandberg

Tune in for more tips and ideas next week.

Marriage and Relationship Education is a learning opportunity, much like you would do in any other important life event. Check out the new video for couples on YouTube: https://youtu.be/xyuUl-JnIhM

Keep up with the latest from the MAREAA online:

Join us at www.mareaa.asn.au or sign up to our Newsletter: http://eepurl.com/bRigGf

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Text, Twitter, Tweet… is your smartphone use causing arguments and endangering those around you?

We have seen how smartphones can enhance our lives, but there is a fine line where use can be perceived as antisocial, causing arguments and endanger those around us.

We are all increasingly enthusiastic users of this technology and doing so across a growing range of social (and solo) situations, always or very often when spending time with friends, walking or watching TV.

A recent report suggested that almost a quarter of mobile consumers use their phones ‘always’ or ‘very often’ talking to friends and when eating at home, or eating out with family or friends. And a disturbing 1 in 10 of us use our smartphones when crossing the road or driving.

Consider your use of mobile technology, and consider those a round you. Is your behaviour anti-social, causing arguments or potentially endangering those around you?

Source: Deloitte Global Mobile Consumer Survey, 2016

http://landing.deloitte.com.au/rs/761-IBL-328/images/tmt-mobile-consumer-2016-final-report-101116.pdf.

Tune in for more tips and ideas next week.

Marriage and Relationship Education is a learning opportunity, much like you would do in any other important life event. Check out the new video for couples on YouTube: https://youtu.be/xyuUl-JnIhM

Keep up with the latest from the MAREAA online:

Join us at www.mareaa.asn.au or sign up to our Newsletter: http://eepurl.com/bRigGf

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Text, Twitter, Tweet… Is your SmartPhone use antisocial, causing arguments and endangering those around you?

We have seen how smartphones can enhance our lives, but there is a fine line where use can be perceived as antisocial, causing arguments and endanger those around us.

We are all increasingly enthusiastic users of this technology and doing so across a growing range of social (and solo) situations, always or very often when spending time with friends, walking or watching TV.

A recent report suggested that almost a quarter of mobile consumers use their phones ‘always’ or ‘very often’ talking to friends and when eating at home, or eating out with family or friends. And a disturbing 1 in 10 of us use our smartphones when crossing the road or driving.

Consider your use of mobile technology, and consider those a round you. Is your behaviour anti-social, causing arguments or potentially endangering those around you?

Source: Deloitte Global Mobile Consumer Survey, 2016

http://landing.deloitte.com.au/rs/761-IBL-328/images/tmt-mobile-consumer-2016-final-report-101116.pdf

Tune in for more tips and ideas next week.

Marriage and Relationship Education is a learning opportunity, much like you would do in any other important life event. Check out the new video for couples on YouTube: https://youtu.be/xyuUl-JnIhM

Keep up with the latest from the MAREAA online:

Join us at www.mareaa.asn.au or sign up to our Newsletter: http://eepurl.com/bRigGf

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Text, Twitter, Tweet… For children, this obsession can start early but needs to be tackled by parents

A recent study claims that there is anecdotal evidence of parents needing to lock away their children’s devices for fear of midnight video watching, texting, and gaming.

According to the Deloitte Global Mobile Consumer Survey, 2016 – we are fast becoming (if not already) an always-on mobile society. Our addiction to our favourite device and the apparent need to check regularly and respond instantly must be in response to our growing fear of missing out or perhaps our love of being always-on.

For children, this obsession can start early but needs to be tackled by parents to ensure good habits are learnt and distractions from mobile technology don’t impact negatively on their health and learning abilities.

Here are some tips:

No technology in the bedroom. The number one recommendation from experts in addressing cyber bullying. Cyber bullying is most likely to occur behind a closed door.

No screens at bedtime or during family time. You don’t have to confiscate their phones, you can get an app that can automatically block activity at a certain time or when a time limit is exceeded.

Approval required. Only allow apps to be downloaded if approved by parents or block access to app store purchases with a password.

Understand online security and safety. Educate your kids, let them know that sharing photos and videos, as well as anything written, can be saved and shared without their knowledge. Invest in kid-safe browsers.

Practice acceptable online behaviour. Let your kids know that they should talk to you if someone is harassing them online or through text. Make sure your children are also aware of the harm they can cause through online bullying.

Reference:

Deloitte Global Mobile Consumer Survey, 2016

http://landing.deloitte.com.au/rs/761-IBL-328/images/tmt-mobile-consumer-2016-final-report-101116.pdf

Tune in for more tips and ideas next week.

Marriage and Relationship Education is a learning opportunity, much like you would do in any other important life event. Check out the new video for couples on YouTube: https://youtu.be/xyuUl-JnIhM

Keep up with the latest from the MAREAA online:

Join us at www.mareaa.asn.au or sign up to our Newsletter: http://eepurl.com/bRigGf

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Text, Twitter, Tweet… be willing to invest the time and effort to developing new habits and balance

Social media has changed the daily lives of couples by:

  • How they stay in touch with others (and reconnect with people);
  • The way couples make friends, how they find acquaintances and how others find partners by connecting with people anywhere in the world;
  • How couples do business, how businesses connect to buyers and potential buyers;
  • How they reveal themselves and share information;
  • How couples allow their voice to be heard – to amplify a message; and
  • How they learn.

This technology also creates difficult situations for couples involving emotional intimacy and fidelity, including the ease of access to personal details, the ease at which private communication can take place and access to pornography. Facebook is increasing cited in divorce proceedings in both the US and UK.

The late Stephen Covey suggests consistent and continued refinement and attention to all of the following four areas in our lives:

  1. Physical;
  2. Intellectual;
  3. Social and
  4. Spiritual.

Often we find we live our lives narrowly focusing on work or home. Think about your life and the balance you maintain. Change is possible and often easier than you think.

Attempting to balance exercise, nutrition and stress management (physical); by reading, visualising, planning and writing (Intellectual); focusing on clarifying values and our commitment, dedicating time to study, our faith and/or meditation (Spiritual); and through our service, being empathic, being synergistic and ensuring security (Social), ensures success.

Don’t get caught up in the demands of life and forget ourselves and our partner. Be proactive and do this for your relationship. “We are the instruments of our own performance, and to be effective, we need to recognize the importance of taking time to regularly sharpen the saw in all four ways”.

You don’t have to get it right the first time. This is part of life’s journey of learning and developing. You will get there if you are willing to invest the time and effort to developing new habits.

Tune in for more tips and ideas next week.

Marriage and Relationship Education is a learning opportunity, much like you would do in any other important life event. Check out the new video for couples on YouTube: https://youtu.be/xyuUl-JnIhM

Keep up with the latest from the MAREAA online:

Join us at www.mareaa.asn.au or sign up to our Newsletter: http://eepurl.com/bRigGf

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Text, Twitter, Tweet… Take breaks from electronic devices and make time for focused attention on one another

Couples are using the internet and mobile technology to communicate with one another, to keep up-to-date with information and news about others. Combined with the ease of access to these communication mediums and their instant and constant influence over couple relationships, its presence and impact cannot be underestimated or ignored.

With over 62% of Australian internet users on social sites such as Facebook and Twitter and average usage at >6hrs/month on social sites and rising (53% women and 47% men), there is little wonder that social usage will be a problem for some relationships.

Consider changing your habits and develop an action plan for your relationship goals:

Is the myriad of today’s electronic devices an ever-present distraction in your home? Do your smartphones have a place at your dinner table? Is your television on more than it is off?

Take breaks from electronic devices and make time for focused attention on one another. You might not even realise how ingrained these habits have become, until you consciously try to break them!

Have you experienced these challenges? Perhaps there are things to celebrate also. Make time to not only celebrate and reflect on how far you’ve come over the years, but also to establish hopes, goals, and resolutions for the year ahead.

Tune in for more tips and ideas next week.

Marriage and Relationship Education is a learning opportunity, much like you would do in any other important life event. Check out the new video for couples on YouTube: https://youtu.be/xyuUl-JnIhM

Keep up with the latest from the MAREAA online:

Join us at www.mareaa.asn.au or sign up to our Newsletter: http://eepurl.com/bRigGf

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Text, Twitter, Tweet… Differences and disagreements are as inevitable in wedding planning as they are in marriage itself

Engaged couples are typically embroiled in the countless details of planning their wedding service and reception. They are also faced with the pressures of a very high price tag.

In many ways, planning a wedding provides the first big set of decisions a couple will make together and tests their ability to function as a team. From finances to family, and communication to conflict, the wedding preparations trigger many of the issues a couple will face throughout their married life providing a symbolic practice field for their relationship.

Differences and disagreements are as inevitable in wedding planning as they are in marriage itself. This is a good time to learn how to deal with them. Here are some strategies you might find helpful to work through with your wedding plans or to discuss with the couple you are working with:

  • Consider how you communicate

Everyday communication patterns like using text or email might be fine for everyday matters, but when you are negotiating a wedding, it’s good to be at your best! Arrange specific time to sit down and discuss your plans and checkin on progress regularly. Commit to a regular checkin and follow up on your actions and report back at your next session.

The standard tools of effective communication taught in marriage and relationship education are particularly important when there is tension between couples. Examples are speaking for yourself using “I-statements” rather than attacking the other person, listening to understand before proposing solutions, and choosing the best time and place to talk about difficult matters.

Tune in for more tips and ideas next week.

Marriage and Relationship Education is a learning opportunity, much like you would do in any other important life event. Check out the new video for couples on YouTube: https://youtu.be/xyuUl-JnIhM

Keep up with the latest from the MAREAA online:

Join us at www.mareaa.asn.au or sign up to our Newsletter: http://eepurl.com/bRigGf

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Text, Twitter, Tweet… Couples, the Internet and Social Media: Being distracted by the wired world

Social media has changed the daily lives of couples by:

  • How they stay in touch with others (and reconnect with people);
  • The way couples make friends, how they find acquaintances and how others find partners by connecting with people anywhere in the world;
  • How couples do business, how businesses connect to buyers and potential buyers;
  • How they reveal themselves and share information;
  • How couples allow their voice to be heard – to amplify a message; and
  • How they learn.

This technology also creates difficult situations for couples involving emotional intimacy and fidelity, including the ease of access to personal details, the ease at which private communication can take place and access to pornography. Facebook is increasing cited in divorce proceedings in both the US and UK.

Whilst most of the qualities that help sustain a good relationship have not changed – commitment, effective communication, constructive conflict and patience, honesty, forgiveness amongst others – there is strong evidence that couples are using these technologies to enhance their relationships. Both the opportunities and threats associated with the use of internet and mobile technologies including the stress associated with their use by couples must be understood and considered to ensure effective communication in all their life stages.

While younger adults in serious relationships are more likely than older couples to report that the internet has had an impact on their relationship, this impact can cut both ways. Many young couples view technology as a way to bring greater intimacy to their relationship, even as it introduces new sources of tension.

  • 45% of online 18-29 year olds in serious relationships say the internet has had an impact on their relationship – 21% say a major impact.
  • 42% of 18-29 year olds with a mobile phone in a serious relationship say their partner has been distracted by their phone while they were together.
  • 41% of online 18-29 year olds in serious relationships felt closer to their partner because of online or text conversations.

“Technology is everywhere and our relationships are no exception,” said Amanda Lenhart, lead author of the report and Senior Researcher at the Pew Research Center. “And for younger adults and those in newer relationships, tools such as mobile phones and social media are there at the beginning and play a greater role today for good and for ill.”

Reference:

  • Cowley, D, 2017: Social Media Statistics Australia – April 2017: https://www.socialmedianews.com.au/social-media-statistics-australia-april-2017/
  • Hampton, K.N., Rainie, L., Lu, W., Shin, I., & Purcell, K. (2014). “Social Media and the Cost of Caring.” Pew Research Center, Washington, DC. Available at: http://www.pewinternet.org/2015/01/15/social-media-and-stress/

Tune in for more tips and ideas next week.

Marriage and Relationship Education is a learning opportunity, much like you would do in any other important life event. Check out the new video for couples on YouTube: https://youtu.be/xyuUl-JnIhM

Keep up with the latest from the MAREAA online:

Join us at www.mareaa.asn.au or sign up to our Newsletter: http://eepurl.com/bRigGf

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Text, Twitter, Tweet… Couples, the Internet and Social Media: It’s not just millenials who are obsessed with technology

The accelerating rate at which new technology is introduced to the public has created a divide between how different generations prefer to communicate – and not just with their friends and family.

Millennials, those born between 1980 and 1994 have penetrated the workforce, and their increases in income has resulted in $200 billion in annual buying power. This generation continues to grow at an alarming rate, becoming the biggest generation in the workforce for the first time in 2016. Boomers, those born between 1946 and 1964, may have been surpassed in numbers by millennials this year, but they still dominate the market with $2.3 trillion in spending power.

It’s no surprise that millennials are on multiple channels and devices simultaneously, but many may not be aware that boomers are much more tech savvy than you expect. 91% of boomers use one or more social media sites. For 58% of these social boomers, the top action taken after use a social networking site was to visit a company website.

We have seen how smartphones can enhance our lives, but there is a fine-greyline where use can be perceived as antisocial, cause arguments, and endanger those around us. We are all increasingly enthusiastic smartphone users and doing so across a growing range of social (and solo) situations. A third use their devices ‘always’ or ‘very often’ when spending time with friends, walking or watching TV. Almost a quarter of mobile consumers use their phones ‘always’ or ‘very often’ talking to friends and when eating at home, or eating out with family or friends. And a disturbing 1 in 10 of us use our smartphones when crossing the road or driving.

References:

Tune in for more tips and ideas next week.

Marriage and Relationship Education is a learning opportunity, much like you would do in any other important life event. Check out the new video for couples on YouTube: https://youtu.be/xyuUl-JnIhM

Keep up with the latest from the MAREAA online:

Join us at www.mareaa.asn.au or sign up to our Newsletter: http://eepurl.com/bRigGf